Speak to a Courtlinked.com Expert Today: (800) 327-1031

CURRENT SERVICES
File My Small Claims
Name Change Dept
Trademarks
Demand Letters
   
 
 
 
 
What is the Statues of Limitations for a small claims action?
 
 

 

 

 

 

 
Get the Information you need
   
When every other method to collect has failed, small claims is the right remedy to seek. Small claims is a lawyer free courtroom designed to hear public disputes in the presence of an actual judge. The associates of Courtlinked.com have assisted thousands of clients in the recovery of their money using the legal procedures of small claims courts.
Small Claims Introduction File Your Small Claims Today!

What is Statute of Limitations?

Wikipedia discribes: Statutes of Limitations is a statute in a common law legal system that is designed to set forth the maximum period of time that a certain legal proceeding based on certain events may be commenced.

A Statute of limitation is basically the amount of years that an individual or a business has to proceed with a legal claim. If the statute of limitation has ran, that individual or the business will not be able to use the legal system to bring a small claims suit. For example, if you are involved in an auto accident in the state of Alabama and have suffered property damages, you would have six years to file a small claims in order to recover property damages.

Statutes of Limitations For Small Claims In Accordance To Your Cause of Action and State
State
Written Contract
Oral Contract
Personal Injury
Property Damages
Alabama
6 Years
6 Years
2 Years
6 Years
Alaska
3 Years
3 Years
2 Years
2 Years
Arizona
6 Years
3 Years
2 Years
2 Years
Arkansas
5 Years
3 Years
3 Years
3 Years
California
4 Years
2 Years
2 Years
3 Years
Colorado
6 Years
6 Years
2 Years
2 Years
Connecticut
6 Years
3 Years
2 Years
2 Years
Delaware
3 Years
3 Years
2 Years
2 Years
District of Columbia
3 Years
3 Years
3 Years
3 Years
Florida
5 Years
4 Years
4 Years
4 Years
Georgia
6 Years
4 Years
2 Years
4 Years
Hawaii
6 Years
6 Years
2 Years
2 Years
Idaho
5 Years
4 Years
2 Years
3 Years
Illinois
10 Years
5 Years
2 Years
5 Years
Indiana
10 Years
6 Years
2 Years
6 Years
Iowa
10 Years
5 Years
2 Years
2 Years
Kansas
5 Years
3 Years
2 Years
2 Years
Kentucky
15 Years
5 Years
1 Year
5 Years
Louisiana
10 Years
10 Years
1 Year
1 Year
Maine
6 Years
6 Years
6 Years
6 Years
Maryland
3 Years
3 Years
3 Years
3 Years
Massachusetts
6 Years
6 Years
3 Years
3 Years
Michigan
6 Years
6 Years
3 Years
3 Years
Minnesota
6 Years
6 Years
2 Years
6 Years
Missouri
5 Years
5 Years
5 Years
5 Years
Montana
8 Years
5 Years
3 Years
2 Years
Nebraska
5 Years
4 Years
4 Years
4 Years
Nevada
6 Years
4 Years
2 Years
3 Years
New Hempshire
3 Years
3 Years
3 Years
3 Years
New Jersey
6 Years
6 Years
2 Years
6 Years
New Mexico
6 Years
4 Years
3 Years
4 Years
New York
6 Years
6 Years
3 Years
3 Years
North Carolina
3 Years
3 Years
3 Years
3 Years
Ohio
15 Years
6 Years
2 Years
4 Years
Oklahoma
5 Years
3 Years
2 Years
2 Years
Oregon
6 Years
6 Years
2 Years
6 Years
Pennsylvania
4 Years
4 Years
2 Years
2 Years
Rhode Island
10 Years
10 Years
3 Years
10 Years
South Carolina
3 Years
3 Years
3 Years
3 Years
South Dekota
6 Years
6 Years
3 Years
6 Years
Tennessee
6 Years
6 Years
1 Year
3 Years
Texas
4 Years
4 Years
2 Years
2 Years
Utah
6 Years
4 Years
4 Years
3 Years
Vermont
6 Years
6 Years
3 Years
3 Years
Virginia
5 Years
3 Years
2 Years
5 Years
Washington
6 Years
3 Years
3 Years
3 Years
West Virginia
10 Years
5 Years
2 Years
2 Years
Wisconsin
6 Years
6 Years
3 Years
6 Years
Wyoming
10 Years
8 Years
4 Years
4 Years
 
 
 
 
Recent FAQ's
When will I collect my judgment?
How long is a judgment good for?